Shopping Cart
Repère

There’s a very feminine and quite sensual feel to Biotopia. 
Subtle at first and grotesque after a while but none of it ever seems abnormal.
All of this without being explicit. The women’s image, even without the presence of the full body, is anchored to its potential for sexuality. We are trained to perceive it before anything else. Even if it’s not there we see it.

 

How did this series, Biotopia, come about?

After a year of instinctive work, I felt all over the place and hungry for a subject that would make me dig deeper. I'm very attracted to plants and feel like I can learn a lot from them so it was a comfortable topic to explore exclusively. While searching for images for that nature focused work, I came across Redouté's roses and it immediately made me want to drop all my other work.

You know when you are looking for an answer and instead you end up finding a better question? Well that's what it was.

These images opened up all that I was looking for. For the visuals but also the illustrator behind it, I was intrigued to figure it all out: the rosebuds, the thorns, how could the hands and birds find their place through such a rich, delicate yet complex environment. It's been a mission to try to find some sort of understanding and balance through dualities.


Could you elaborate on this description: "The many hands, by metonymy, refer to the bodies of women who cannot be completely naked. Unconsciously adapted or forced to restrain themselves. Their whole body finds no place, as if they did not exist. But by the varied gestures and size of their hands, as so many attempts to integrate into the flourishing world, they give signs of life."

Yeah, I love how this idea turned out. Although I'm not sure I can express all nuances of the complex subject as accurately through words as I do through images.

We are so used to seeing women fragmented and filtered in visual media that we do not even notice what is missing. All these hands are like the weeds that won't give up from trying to live in this gorgeous environment even though it’s not suited for them. Through the long and relatively quiet battle, I can't separate the massive lack of sense and freedom from the strenuous resilience. It's all incredibly moving, and I have a hard time drawing the line between the sadness and the beauty of it all.


You were originally a photographer and graphic designer. Do you still work in those creative fields?

Yes-ish. I do art directions for clients (mostly branding) and that allows me to do a lot of different things, including graphic design and photos. I still do a decent amount of creation through graphic design but less production. As for photography, although my passion was skateboarding photography, I worked in different fields but it's been a couple years since I took a gig as photographer and I'm glad for that change cause being an art director on set feels a lot more natural and I enjoy it a lot more! I still take my camera out every now and then (a.k.a. mostly if I'm being a tourist).


Who are some of your favorite contemporary artists?

Polly Morgan and Stikki Peaches. They both had a massive impact on me and without their work, I doubt I would be making mine today.


How does the naked female (and arguably sexualized) body figure into your collages?

I like this question. 
I think it goes back to the message we get as women saying “if you're not here fulfilling a sexual role, there's no place for you.”
So the bodies aren’t present. Yet the hands are the only parts who seems to be alive!

There’s a very feminine and quite sensual feel to Biotopia. 
Subtle at first and grotesque after a while but none of it ever seems abnormal.
All of this without being explicit. The women’s image, even without the presence of the full body, is anchored to its potential for sexuality. We are trained to perceive it before anything else. Even if it’s not there we see it.

What are your most precious tools and material resources?

Sharp blades! Fresh glue is also very important.
For the images, is varies a lot depending on the project I’ll be working on, but digging into old books always connects a lot of dots for me.
Spray paint is also growing on me. I love how straight forward it feels to work with it. (it’s been used for the backgrounds for Biotopia)


What projects are you working on or looking forward to working on?

I am almost finished with the follow-up of Biotopia, Biochronic, which is a lot more colorful and includes new natural subjects. But what I’m really into at the moment is a series approaching the intersection of science and religion and the lore that binds them. The process is more reflective and the pieces are getting a lot bigger, I find it all very exciting!

Repère

by Janna Yotte

$465.00


Materials:
Collage on watercolor paper with spray paint and gouache. Floating mount on foam core.
Dimensions:
20 inches x 20 inches

We accept return requests within two weeks from delivery of artwork.

Free shipping on all domestic orders.

← Previous artwork