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Alison Glanville Jones

Where are you from originally and where do you live now?

Iʼm originally from Hong Kong but I grew up in Scotland. Iʼm a bit of a nomad and travel a lot, but I use Liverpool as my base as it is where my family is.


What is Liverpool like today (for those of us who only know it as the industrial city that produced the Beatles)?

Having always been a constant visitor, I have watched Liverpool unfurl as a vibrant, creative and inspiring place to be. You canʼt really get away from itʼs claims to fame, and nor should you have to. What the city and its people have created through the sea, sport, music and industry is testament to a Northern mentality. What is really exciting though - especially as a creative - is a willingness to evolve and change and embrace a very visual and expressive culture. It holds some of my favorite places to see Art – I am never out of the Walker Art Gallery – and uses the city as a canvas, constantly ( very exciting Liverpool Biennial this year). And just to cap it off…. the people are pretty lovely too ( though I may be a tad biased).


The theme of this series is waiting, particularly the waiting done by women. How did you land upon this subject?

The theme of waiting has always been a constant of mine. I don’t know whether it’s because I grew up hearing stories of my Nan waiting for my Granddad, who was constantly at sea, or whether it comes from a slight fascination with the condition of women, especially those who are left at home waiting for their husbands. I had recently been doing a project in a fishing village in Fife, Scotland and had collected a myriad of stories from little old ladies whose husbands had always gone out to sea and how there were always left, looking out of the window. I suppose I needed to make a start on sharing these stories.



What sort of commercial work do you do as an illustrator?

I work across a range of commercial media ( Editorial, Advertising, Print etc) and do a ridiculous amount of personal projects ( it’s like I can’t breathe if I’m not creating something). A lot of my work these days supports my work as a Theatre Designer and I am currently working on a book.


A page from the artist's sketchbook.


When it comes to fashion and visual design as a whole, what is your favorite era?

I’m a huge admirer of print and textile design and take a lot from designers from the 1930’s and 50’s.

Written by Kate Singleton — January 14, 2013


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